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Category Archive for 'Extremely Loud & Incredibly Close'

About all of it, and broadly, because that is how I’ve been thinking about it: in broad terms. And think about it I certainly have. In fact — and I do not mean this in any hard core academic sense (though maybe I should profess otherwise) — I’ve thought and spoken about this class far […]

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Thanks again to Yahoo! news, I’ve come across something that I think relates quite strongly not only to the entire semester we’ve spent in this class, but also quite specifically to The Submission, as well as Verena’s presentation on her visit to New York. The link I clicked on reads “See new World Trade Center […]

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This post is in response to Sarah’s oral report, so clearly I’ve been sitting on it for a while and I apologize for that. Miguel de Unamuno, a Spanish/Basque writer, presented an analysis of human motivation regarding living and dying that I show below in chart form. As it relates to this class, each character […]

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While watching Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close, I was struck by how independent Oskar is.  He travels throughout New York City – not just within Manhattan but to other boroughs – with nothing but a backpack and his ideas.  I just couldn’t get past the idea that someone so young, not to mention with so […]

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To follow up the presentation I made in class last Tuesday, I’d like to talk a bit about communication in the novel. It’s funny how I will talk to you now through writing on a blog in the interwebs about the communication errors made by a few fictional people in 300 pages. In my presentation […]

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Max von Sydow

For those of you who might be interested, here’s an interview in which the great Swedish actor Max von Sydow discusses his role in the film adaptation of Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close. Click here or on the image below to watch the interview.

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I think Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close is an anti-war novel, subtly. Oskar doesn’t talk that much about the war or terrorists throughout the novel, but I think Foer argues against the novel by describing the horror and people’s reactions to it. One of the more prominent ones is when Oskar’s grandfather is in the bombing of […]

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 “A lot of the time I’d get that feeling like I was in the middle of a huge black ocean, or in deep space, but not in the fascinating way. It’s just that everything was incredibly far away from me.” – Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close It can be extremely hard to figure things out. […]

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I came to care very deeply for Oskar while reading this book. I didn’t always completely agree with his all of his decisions throughout the book, but what really matters are the intentions behind his actions. What caused me to like and feel connected to this nine-year-old boy was his heart. Oskar embarks on his […]

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Perhaps one of the most interesting topics in this book is ‘The Renter.’ As we all later find out, this is Oskar’s grandpa, his dad’s dad. Throughout the book we were exposed to clips inside the grandfather’s mind, mostly concerning the act of leaving his wife and his unborn child. We basically get to know a […]

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I hate to break it to you, but I judge books by their covers. I picked this book to do my project on based on the cover alone because I thought the look of it was incredible. Obviously, the color is one of the first things to catch a reader’s eye. Because the color is […]

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title

We have not talked about the title of this book yet. I would like to do so in the context of the two manifestations of the phrase “extremely loud and incredibly close” that I found in the text. The first is on page 165 – “then, out of nowhere, a flock of birds flew by […]

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Mother

Of all the characters to which any real attention seems to have been paid by Jonathan Safran Foer in Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close, it seems that Oskar’s mother is the least accessible. This might seem to be a pointless or obvious observation; she is featured quite sparsely in the novel.  And her seeming not […]

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The other day, we spoke about the fairy tale aspect Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close. It is trying to inject some kind of moving beauty into a tragic event such as 9/11. In Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close, Jonathan Safran Foer uses the pattern of the quest, which is an adventurous journey undergone by the […]

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While it seems that Jonathan Foer’s Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close is pushing the traditional boundaries for what a book contains, books have been changing for the last 600 years. The invention of the printing press marks the beginning of innovation within books, since it allowed authors to duplicate and publish their ideas over and over […]

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As discussed in class last week, Extremely Loud & Incredibly Close by Jonathan Safran Foer  is a very fun light read about September 11th compared to other books on the topic. The main character, Oskar Schell, is certainly very entertaining for his age. However, I think that entertainment is also very sickening in a way. […]

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I’ve noticed a trend in the literature we’ve been evaluating in this class. Children hold it together pretty damn well. In fact, I believe it could be argued that they do better at remaining functional in the face of disaster than many of the adults in their lives and in these stories. Sure, Oskar’s quest […]

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